Thursday, April 22, 2010

A cultural excursion into the heart of Inhotim


A little late into Earth Day, but never too late to care...

I am linking this post to my dear friend,  Housewife Bliss, who is hosting a weekly blog hop. Of all of her nifty categories, I have chosen: "A little birdie told me about..."  In characteristic Housewife Bliss style, I will try to emulate my hostess' grace and elegance in reminding us that, as housewives we must maintain a well rounded knowledge of current events and the arts, which reach beyond our blissful homemaking chores.  This will provide our children guidance and our husbands and friends the stimulation needed to nurture these relationships.  So today I chose to share a little bit of  'culture' with my readers.

The newest issue of Departures has been appropriately dubbed The Culture Issue.  A pretty fun read.  One of the articles was on the Instituto Cultural Inhotim, in Brazil.  Inhotim is the home of one of the largest botanical collections in the planet, which also serves as a depository of greater-than-life, specially commissioned installations by well known contemporary artists from around the world.  The institute is located in a remote area of the country.  Its beauty is only enjoyed by locals and art world insiders.  I would love to share a little bit of it with you:


 3,000 acres of preserved native forests and gardens.  The landscape was designed to surprise the senses with unfurling vistas as you turn corners of the winding paths.
 Home of over 136 species of birds, it is also houses over 3,500 plant species 

 The botanical park is punctuated by pavilions... 13 of them.  Each with its own collection or installation.  The one above is an installation by Cildo Meireles, "Atraves"("Through") in mixed media.

 Chris Burden's Beam Drop
"Rodoviaria de  Brumadinho" (Brumadinho's Bus Station) John Ahearn and Rigoberto Torres. Fiberglass and auto paint
Lezart" by Tunga. Steel, copper and magnets.
Doug Aitken's Sonic Pavilion, where when you enter it a buzzing sound that varies with the time of day amplifies the noise coming from below the earth 300 meters deep.

I cannot stress the uniqueness and magnitude of this place.  There is no other museum of this magnitude and scope in the world. The vast landscape and numerous stand alone exhibits within this remote location is singular in every way.  I am glad I had a chance to share it with you.

PICTURES TAKEN BY VARIOUS PHOTOGRAPHERS FROM MULTIPLE PUCLICATIONS.  IF YOU TOOK THIS PICTURE, PLEASE  CONTACT ME SO I CAN GIVE YOU THE APPROPRIATE CREDIT.

12 comments:

JDB said...

Amazing! The botanic gardens and forest is especially breathtaking. Thank you for sharing!

Housewife Bliss said...

So happy you shared this, stunning, I just love the beam drop. I suspect you could return there day after day and see something new, in a different light and never tire of it. Thanks for hopping along, fab post!

The Zhush said...

Seems like a truly amazing place! Was that a giant braid of hair in one of the installations?!

Cathy M~(checkitoff) said...

delightful~glad to have my dose of culture for the day:)

nkp said...

Stunning. That would be the trip of a lifetime. I have my Departures hiding in a pile of mail. I need to pull it out asap!

SPLENDEROSA said...

I hope one day to visit Brazil. These pics are beautiful, C. Happy Day.

AB HOME Interiors said...

Oh my. what lovely photos! I could get lost in those for hours!

Megan Carroll said...

Beautiful work and awe inspiring, you should check our Andy Goldworthy's work, same sort of themes but adds the element of time!

Allie and Pattie said...

Absolutely stunning! On my wish list of places to go
xoxo Pattie

Pemberley said...

Thanks for the culcha lovey!

Donald's Garden said...

How very very cool! A new place I want to see before I die!

Kathysue said...

Amazing images. Each one drew me in. I loved the rope braid in its wavy pattern in the landscape. Thank you for a touch of cultural today. Kathysue

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